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Living your own life can feel like a difficult prospect for mothers apart from children. I suspect it reminds many of us of well meaning  family and friends advising us to ‘move on’, ‘forget the past’ or ‘get over’ the fact that we don’t live or have contact with our children. We know that people who care about us just want us to be happy, but ‘getting over’ isn’t easy. For those of us who chose to live apart from children, ‘moving on’ can be more difficult than we imagined. Feeling guilty, having divided loyalties and experiencing delayed grief is common.

Living our own lives, having dreams and aspirations may not seem possible after all that we have been through. Perhaps we have been so focused on what our child is or isn’t feeling or what our ex partner or parents say about us that we have forgotten how to live and enjoy life. Maybe we have experienced so much emotional distress we think that we don’t have a life, don’t deserve a life and that all we are capable of, is feeling pain. This isn’t true. We are more than our problems, thoughts and feelings. Just because life has been this painful so far, it doesn’t mean it has to keep on hurting. If life is a bowl of cherries it doesn’t mean we have to settle with the pits! (thanks to Erma Bombeck).

So how do we live our own lives to the full?

Self care is the starting point. In part this is about nurturing ourselves – eating healthily, taking exercise, having warm baths and so on. But self care is also an attitude towards our lives in which we are responsible for ourselves. An empowering attitude that says: I am mistress of my own ship. I am responsible for my choices in life. I am responsible for identifying and meeting my needs. I am responsible for solving or finding help to solve my own problems and for learning to live with those I cannot solve. I am responsible for how much I enjoy life. I am important. I count for something and even if the most important person to me in the world rejects me I am still real, loving and lovable.

We are living our own lives when we…

  • Endeavour to work out what we can change and what we cannot change, then stop trying to change the things we can’t. If we don’t have control of a problem or if we have done what we can to try to solve it, we learn to live with or in spite of, our problem or circumstances.
  • Try to live happily, focusing courageously on what is good in our lives today – and feel gratitude for these things. In time, we can come to experience that appreciating the little things, making the most of what we do have, makes what we have increase in value.
  • Practice letting go with love. Letting go doesn’t mean we don’t care. It means that we learn to love, sometimes from afar, without driving ourselves crazy. This involves living in the present moment. We allow life to happen without forcing or trying to control it and we let go of regrets and fears about the future.

The biggest risk of not living our life is that life passes us by. As a counsellor, I have worked with mothers who have lived apart from children for so many years they can no longer say they ‘live apart’, as their children are now adults with children of their own. As we work together, they grieve over having lived apart but also over the loss of not setting themselves free to live their lives and make themselves happy. As I tell them they have suffered enough, given enough, they have ‘done their time’, I encourage each one of these wonderful women to live well and to the full, one day at a time. And this is my dearest wish for you too.

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Sarah’s new self-help book: A Mother Apart

Support for women

Sarah specialises in counselling and training women. She helps non-resident mothers find inner peace by dealing with guilt, distress and other difficult feelings which can be experienced when living apart from their child. Her self-help book, 'A Mother Apart', published by Crown House, is available now. She also supports business women grow in confidence whilst growing their businesses. To find out more, please visit Sarah Hart's website

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