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I regularly listen to mothers living apart from children who blame themselves. Self-blame highlights all the things we think we have done wrong, making circumstances our fault. Sometimes self-blame is linked to what we believe about who we are as people. We think there is something inherently wrong with us, that we don’t deserve anything other than to be treated badly.

Here is a typical scenario…I know a mother who lives apart from her children who won’t mind me telling you how she had for years, felt solely responsible for causing her children damage and pain. If she was telling you her story a while ago you would have heard her say that it was her fault for marrying the father of her children, she should have stood up to him sooner, she shouldn’t have been so emotional in court or as angry towards the Cafcass officer. Most of all she would tell you how she is responsible, she is to blame for causing her children distress even though her husband badmouths her, does not encourage the children to have contact with her and is not interested in co-parenting their children.

I also hear from women who do the opposite. They blame others – another person or group of people, making outcomes their fault. They tend to view the world through the lens of other people being totally responsible for causing them distress – their ex, their solicitor, their children or their parents for rejecting them.

Here is an example…Not long ago I had a conversation with woman who blamed her father for the many ways in which he had let her down over the years – he had divorced her mother and left her to live in another country when she was a teenager. When she tried to speak about her fears and worries, his problems were always bigger than hers. He had told her he would move back their ‘home’ country when he retired but he changed his mind and didn’t apologise for it. It was clear how hurt and aggrieved this woman was. She held her father responsible, blamed him, for how she felt even though she is 53 years old and he had died five years earlier.

What do these two examples have in common? Very painful circumstances edge us towards a tendency to either blame ourselves or project it on to others. It’s what we do in order to make sense of and try to deal with a host of difficult feelings. Whether we turn it inwards or push it outwards, both of these ways of blaming and fault finding have a common outcome – they keep us stuck in painful feelings and stuck in time. Self-blame generates remorse, regret, a lowering of self worth and eroding of confidence. Blaming others fuels anger, a desire for revenge, and a sense of powerlessness as we stew on the injustice of our circumstances. We don’t deserve any of this negativity!

If you recognise within yourself a tendency to self-blame or blame others you might like to consider the following:

  • With an honest heart, ask yourself whether you have a genuine need to take responsibility for your behaviour or circumstance which you might be avoiding because it feels too painful or hard to acknowledge. This might include a truthful look at how for example, you deal with your anger, how perhaps drinking is having a negative impact on your life and other people, how you monitor and manage depression and the like. Taking responsibility for yourself includes finding a professional to help you work through and take control of your behaviour.
  • When we blame ourselves, we often believe we are responsible for causing negative feelings and reactions in others, sometimes those who have manipulated or abused us and most particularly our children. Recognise that self-blame is a trap.  Blaming yourself serves no one. It does not make amends to anybody, it won’t take away anyone else’s pain, least of all yours. It won’t rid you of any guilt you might feel. Acknowledging and taking an honest look at our feelings is the key. A true sense of freedom and inner peace comes when we are able to differentiate between the things we are really responsible for and the heavy, unnecessary burden of other people’s responsibilities.
  • Blaming others is a form of protection. When we blame others we are trying to devalue or discredit them, and in the process we hope to find ourselves and our own actions superior to theirs. Consider healthier ways to boost your self-worth and confidence, ways that aren’t linked to or controlled by anyone else. When we choose not to focus our energy on blaming others (even though they have caused us hurt and harm), we avoid the unhappy high jacking of ourselves that comes when dwelling on them, giving the person we blame centre stage in our life. They don’t deserve the star role and you don’t deserve the torment.
  • Praise is the opposite of blame. Try turning self-blame on its head by appreciating and congratulating yourself for being the harmonious and wonderful person that you are. Likewise, try turning the blaming of others on its head by finding some redeeming trait or behaviour in this person, even if it is only that like all of us they are human and therefore flawed. Do it for you, not for them. Why should you? Because you will be shrinking the image of them in your mind, reducing their negative powerful hold on you.

Until next time, take care.

Warmly

Sarah

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Sarah’s new self-help book: A Mother Apart

Support for women

Sarah specialises in counselling and training women. She helps non-resident mothers find inner peace by dealing with guilt, distress and other difficult feelings which can be experienced when living apart from their child. Her self-help book, 'A Mother Apart', published by Crown House, is available now. She also supports business women grow in confidence whilst growing their businesses. To find out more, please visit Sarah Hart's website

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